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Introduction

May 15, 2010

So you’ve been asked to music direct a school musical. And you think, hey, that sounds like fun. Maybe you’re a choir director, maybe you’re a parent with some music background. Maybe you’re a pianist who sings a little, and they’re giving you your first shot.

Well, you’re right. It is going to be fun. It’s also going to drive you crazy. And there are going to be a bunch of things you didn’t think about that will drive you nuts, and you’ll wish somebody had told you about them. This blog will hopefully be helpful in outlining the various things to consider as you music direct a show, and it’s based on the many many things I did wrong over the years I’ve directed school musicals.

UPDATE (June 23, 2016):

In the six years since I began this blog, it’s changed slightly to include in depth discussions of specific works I’ve had the chance to Music Direct. There are also many more resources for the Music Director now than there were then, including other valuable websites and some really fine facebook communities where Music Directors can vent and share advice. Hopefully this site can contribute to those resources. You should know that for the most part, Music Directors want to help each other out. Successful Music Directors are by necessity collaborators. You are not alone, unless you choose to be! Use these and other online resources or get a mentor to improve your craft. When you get better, the job gets easier. I promise.

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One comment

  1. I see this becoming a book someday! With lots of funny stories and comic strips!



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